Red Head

The only thing holding me back from going red is the upkeep.

I was reminded of this recently when exchanging blog comments with Meghan from Sweat Daily(dot)com. Meghan is a blonde gone red, a runner and a hair stylist, who was kind enough to give me the low down on making the change.

Here was her advice:

“RED is the most high maintenance of all the colors. The reason why is because the red color molecule is soooo large that it has a difficult time getting into the hair shaft. And because of this, it fades very easily. Fading is thought to be a negative aspect, but it can actually be quite positive. Because the hair fades, you have opportunity to try whatever color you desire, and can easily switch it up. For example, you can start out with a more vibrant red that may fade to a ginger or strawberry color.”

Yesterday, as I cruised the Interwebz while re-watching every episode of Girls (and the Boardwalk Empire finale thrown in .. ..cause yes), and I came across an image of two of the most perfect redheads on Earth.

It’s enough to make me reconsider the color.

I’ve written before about my love for Christina Hendricks, but Vivienne Westwood (for the non-fashiony-fans) is a legend; a visionary and icon in the industry. My respect for this woman runs deep.

This photo …

I’m calling my hair girl tomorrow.

M.

Ever dyed your hair a radically different color? Did it stick or did you go back au natural?

Incredible redheads Vivienne Westwood and Christina Hendricks, photographed by Greg Williams.

Original Image Source.

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Comma Too? You?

Whenever I have a grammar or punctuation question, my first stop in the search is a visit to Grammar Girl.

Her answers always make sense, and when I’m still confused, she responds to messages on Twitter. How I love a true grammarista!

Yesterday I sent a question regarding what seemed to be a new push toward removing the comma from before the word “too”. My writer friends and I have been up in arms over the change.

Her response was that she didn’t get the impression it was a recent thing, but guided me to her post on the subject for some clarification.

Sometimes in grammar and punctuation, issues come up that can be discussed. In professional editing, when questionable changes are made, the best editors are able to justify their choices, making the act of editing much like writing; creative within boundaries of proper form.

It has been much to my dismay, since my continuous testing failures at CloudCrowd, that 3.16 of their style guide says this:

“Do not use comma before the words “too”, “also”, “as well” and any similar terms.”

Such a definitive rule with no grey areas for discussion. No wonder I failed.

Grammar Girl’s post in regard to “comma too” gives a writer the freedom to decide for themselves whether or not the comma should to be used.

Apparently, many children’s book-publishers agree with Grammar Girl and not with CloudCrowd. In four recently published children’s books (checked out this week at our local library), the comma is being used freely in front of “too” restoring my faith in publishers everywhere.

I like commas an awful lot (it borders on an addiction), so I appreciate the freedom to decide if and when they should be used (in this case, specifically).

How about you? You, too?

M.

Are you with Grammar Girl and me, or do you take the side of CloudCrowd?

An example of the comma being used in front of the "too". This came fromt eh adorable book Crafty Chloe by
An example of my point from the adorable book Crafty Chloe by Kelli DiPucchio and illustrated by Heather Ross. Moms … go and find this book. It’s sweet and crafty! We love it!

Intentions, Sophie and the Sea

It’s common at the start of a yoga class to set an intention for the day’s practice.

Different from a goal, which is something you work toward with a focus for the future, an intention is meant to give you a focus in the present.

Bruce Black, from Writing Yoga with Bruce Black, explained it far better than I ever could …

“… setting your intention is like drawing an arrow from the quiver of your heart.

You aim the arrow at a distant target, a reflection of your heart’s desire, and with care and mindfulness release the bowstring.

And as the arrow flies toward the target, it draws your heart toward its destiny.”

My intention was set; my arrow aimed at first-born (Sophie) who becomes troubled when I leave for my Friday night trips away (an unhappy agreement made during mediation to give her father more time to parent without my ever-presence).

She cries as I leave, and as I jump into my car and drive away, I can’t help but wonder for how long she feels the pain of my departure.

There is nothing I can do to ease her pain when I’m gone.

At the end of yesterday’s class, prior to a deeply personal moving meditation and an awfully good time spent upside down in playful inversions, the class returned to our backs for quiet savasana.

As proof that I’d set the right intention, the prettiest song came through the speakers above my head; a version of Sea of Love I hadn’t ever heard.

For Sophie I’d set my intention. Now and forever, Cat Power’s Sea of Love will be our song.

M.

Do you set intentions off of the mat? Does a particular song remind you of someone you love?

Healthy Eating and the Gingerbread Jerks

It wasn’t the realization of the added ten pounds on the doctor’s scale (at which I cried) or the 2 minute per mile slower running time; not the puffy face in recent photos nor the general feeling of blah. There’s no reason for jump starting the healthy eating plan (again) other than it is time.

For the past two days I ate things like this:

  • A piece of Millet bread with a quarter of an avocado spread like butter, topped with a scrambled egg (and two egg whites) and a spoonful of fresh salsa.
  • Juice made from carrots, celery, apple, ginger, kale, beets, and huge bunches of spinach.
  • Gwyneth’s Detox Chicken over millet with a side of kale chips.
  • Back to Nature’s Multi-Seed Crackers with half a piece of jalapeno cheese and a slice of uncured honey ham.
  • Apples.
  • More juice.
  • Whole wheat crusted chicken nuggets baked in the oven with green beans and tomatoes on the side.

Two days of healthy eating and a small dose of exercise (a three-mile run yesterday), and one would assume I was completely on track.

But there’s always a hitch when it comes to clean eating, this time it came in the form of tiny white-fudge-frosted gingerbread men (120 calories for three) nestled inside a pretty Christmas colored box.

If it weren’t for those sneaky gingerbread men I would have conquered two full days free from processed sugar.

Except.

Except their pull over me was too strong that I ate three. And then I ate three more. And the 240 calories I ingested happened faster than you can holler, “KALE!”

The good news is that I got a grip on the situation and stopped. I didn’t go back for more. But I thought about it a lot (a lot, a lot), before running far enough from the kitchen that I was no longer tempted.

One day at a time.

One day at a time.

M.

Do you eat clean or do you struggle? What is it that makes you attack the gingerbread men?

Cute little jerks.
Cute little jerks.

The Kitchen House – A Good Read

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom tells the story of characters living in the 1800s; a time of indentured servitude and slavery; tough subject matter I would have shied away from had it not been for book’s glowing reviews.

Sometimes I choose a book that I’m sure will be a good read, only to close its pages in disappointment when it turns out to be a 100 pager. Other times I choose not to read a book because I’m afraid of the subject matter or because I’m certain it wasn’t written for me (basing a book on its cover is naughty and unwise).

The Kitchen House is turning out to be one that will be added to my list of all-time favorites despite (or maybe because of) it’s tough placement in history. The characters are well-developed. The story is beautifully written (could easily become a costume-rich screen epic). Clearly researched. Written with care and love. It’s tapped into the part of me that yearns for understanding and compassion. 30 chapters in I hope for a happy finish for Lavinia and Belle. I hope that Marshall finds a soul and that Mama lives long.

Yesterday I added myself to the website called GoodReads, which allows me to put its link (along with a picture of my current read) in the widgets on my sidebar.

If you scroll down you can see the box with The Kitchen House proudly displayed.

Click it. Read it. You will not be disappointed.

M.

Are you on GoodReads? Have you read The Kitchen House? 

For the Love of Haiku – A Poetry Game

I am stealing and copying in abundance this weekend; additional imitation and flattery.

All About Lemon has started a blogging game called, “For the Love of Haiku.” Using the Japanese poetic form (17 moraes; syllables of  5, 7, and 5), poets add meaning to Ms. Lemon’s art collages that are updated and changed weekly.

Once you link up, you’re added to the list of haiku contributors. At the end of the month, votes are calculated to find the winner with the most likes.

Blogging good fun!

Here is my contribution …

Princesses beware

Bored extraterrestrials

Roll like bullet trains

————————

Wear your bunny ears

Smile wide as the train rolls by

Rats can’t dim your shine

M.

Too deep? Think you might give it a try? Not a blogger? Leave your contribution in my comments!

My Life in Numbers

Anne Woodman from Writing by the Numbers always starts off her posts with a nod to the numerals that bear importance to her life and her work. I can never write anything number related without first thinking of Anne.

This morning I received an email update from Christine at Love, Life, Surf, who had followed another blogger’s lead (Grteta from GFunctified) and created a list of numbers, which organized some of her life’s data.

It’s fun to play with numbers, and in honor of my blogging buddies, I thought I’d give it a go.

If my daughters were a part of this discussion they would accuse me of being a copy-cat, and in that they’d be correct.

Imitation, though, is the sincerest form of flattery.

1971 was the year I was born.

13 is my favorite number.

7 is a pretty good number too, especially when a slash is drawn through the center.

3 is how many times a year I get my hair cut.

1 is the number of marathons I’ve completed.

2  marathons will be run before I die.

1 piece of jewelry is enough (I feel like a peacock when I accessorize more).

04043 is Kennebunk’s zip code.

155 is my perfect weight.

14 is how old I was when my dad died.

7 is (at last count) my number of siblings.

39 is how old I was when my birth sister found me.

55 feels awfully fast on the freeway.

2  boyfriends were serious husband contenders, had the timing been better.

63 degrees is the perfect temperature at any time of year.

3 is the number of times I do dishes everyday.

0 is how much I love doing dishes.

1985 was the year I first kissed a boy (for real).

36 plus DD is a number that needs to be contained.

206 posts have been published on this blog.

8 is the number of hours I get to sleep at night.

12 hours of sleep would be better.

5 is the age of my twins, who are responsible for not allowing me more sleep.

2 dead yoga mats are kept in my living room for use with exercise videos where sneakers are needed (don’t all dead yoga mats go the sneaker route?).

5 products must to be used on my face in the morning to make me look alive.

780 lovely people follow me on Twitter.

4 last names would follow Martha if I decided to use them all (Osmundson Feldman Merrill Wills).

1 more baby in my home would make me really happy.

1 little dog will have to do.

M.

What is your favorite number? How much do you love dishes? What do you do with dead yoga mats?

Kitchen Art Print, Kitchen Wall Decor Digital Print, BLUE Typography Kitchen Quote Wall Art, Quote & Digital Illustration for Kitchen
Kitchen Art Print by Susana Parada. $19.00 on Etsy at Parada Creations.